A unique sport

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Color guard practices focus on flag work, choreography, teamwork

Every Tuesday night during the marching band season, beginning at 6 p.m. and ending at 9 p.m., the color guard makes the trek out to school for the second time in a row to practice as an individual section. They do this so that they can practice separately from the rest of the band and focus on the specific components that make color guard its own unique sport (if you will). Flag work is not the only thing that one must master to be able to succeed in color guard. Dancing plays a large role in this form of art, as well as good hand-eye coordination and the ability to work as a part of a team.

My favorite thing about being in color guard is how the color guard is a big group, basically like a family.”

— Elissa Staten

Color guard is a great sport to be in not just because of its physical intensity and mental demands but also because of its ability to bring people together as a group. It has helped many people to become more involved in extracurricular activities at school and it has given people a family that they can always rely on to be there for them.

 “My favorite thing about being in color guard is how the color guard is a big group, basically like a family,” senior Elissa Staten said. “And it’s a second home for a lot kids…It’s easy for them to come in to practice knowing that they have a support group to support them no matter what.”

The color guard is doing an amazing job this year so far and is looking forward to winning a lot more competitions with the marching band in their colorful show.  

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